Opportunity For Youth

Photo of the blog author By Ron Fanfair,
Toronto Police Service
Published: 11:52 a.m. August 18, 2014

Programs that provide opportunities for young people to develop into useful citizens appeal to Superintendent John Tanouye.

Three teenage boys in military uniform looking forward
Students enrolled in the Pathfinders of Canada at launch of the program
  • Three teenage boys in military uniform looking forward
  • One man in military uniform standing to left of man in TPS uniform

Though he’s no longer the 51 Division unit commander, Tanouye didn’t mind driving from Scarborough – he’s in charge of 41 Division – to lend his support to Pathfinders of Canada launch at Harbourfront Centre on August 13.

The Military Academy of Canada’s (RCM) governing council will oversee the program open to youths between the ages of 12-21.

“Programs such as this helps with the development of young people,” said Tanouye. “It provides them with the same values and moral ethics we at Toronto Police embrace and those are things like camaraderie, respect, reliability and teamwork.

“This is a good stepping stone for young people, particularly those aspiring to become police officers. Participants will be instilled with discipline and a structure that will enable them to make the easy transition when that time comes.”

Minister of Community and Social Services Helena Jaczek joined provincial Minister of Children & Youth Services Tracy MacCharles and Scarborough-Agincourt MPP Soo Wong at the launch.

“As Minister of Children & Youth Services in Ontario and the mother of two teenagers, I recognize how important it is to provide mentorship to the next generation of leaders,” said MacCharles. “I have true admiration and respect for programs like Pathfinders of Canada that are committed to helping our young people succeed.”

The Pathfinders Canada executive team comprises Brigadier Marvin Watson who is the RCM’s chief director general, Colonel Bob Barnabas and Keisha Johnson who is the program’s chief administrative officer.

“We took stock of what Canadian youths say matters most to their engagement in their education and success,” said Johnson. “We also looked at research that other agencies and institutions have done to identify the benchmark and framework for success in life and work. Then we looked at where the gaps were and arrived at what we can do to help our young people thrive in life and work.”

Commencing in September with two cohorts in the Greater Toronto Area, students will meet once weekly during the evening and one weekend monthly for a full academic year.

TPS crest watermark