Students Respond To Call For Assistance

Photo of the blog author By Ron Fanfair,
Toronto Police Service
Published: 11:38 a.m. December 18, 2015

The response was overwhelming to Constable Richard Diodati’s call earlier this month to schools in Etobicoke for assistance for a Christmas toy drive.

A group of boys and girls holding toys with three men in TPS uniform beside a police sign
Our Lady of Sorrows students and teacher David Ferrari delivered their toys directly to 22 Division officers Staff Sergeant Doug Macdonald, Sergeant John Clarke and Constable Rich Diodati
  • A group of boys and girls holding toys with three men in TPS uniform beside a police sign
  • Boys and girls with a man in TPS uniform with toys beside a minivan
  • Boys and girls with a man in TPS uniform kneeling in front of a Christmas tree
  • A group of boys and girls alongside a man in TPS uniform near a TPS minivan
  • A man in TPS uniform with boys and girls holding toys beside a Christmas tree
  • A woman and two girls holding toys with a man in TPS uniform sitting in the trunk of a TPS minivan

A number of schools answered the call from the 22 Division officer, resulting in a substantial donation.

“We were able to pack two police vehicles with toys for various charitable organizations in central and south Etobicoke,” said the Community Liaison Officer. “It was great to see the schools teaching students the importance of helping and giving back to their communities. This was one of those terrific opportunities and teaching moments.”

Among the schools answering Diodati’s “Officer Needs Assistance” call were Humber Valley, John English, Seventh Street and David Hornell Public Schools as well as St. Elizabeth and Our Lady of Sorrow Catholic Schools.

Seventh Street Public School daycare worker Elly Smith made a $75 donation in the memory of her husband, Jim Smith, who died suddenly last April while nearly 80 Our Lady of Sorrows Grade Seven students delivered unwrapped toys to 22 Division.

“I am so happy with the way my schools responded to make this toy drive a great success,” added Diodati, who oversees 51 elementary and middle schools in the west-end Division. “People will forget what you said and people will forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel.”

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