Safety A Choice On Roads

By Ron Fanfair, Toronto Police Service Published: 1:20 p.m. May 12, 2015

Collisions, for the most part, are not caused by accident, says Toronto Police Service Traffic Services Constable Clint Stibbe.

A man in TPS uniform leans in towards an open car window
An officer stops a motorist during a RIDE spotcheck looking for impaired drivers

“That’s what everybody seems to think,” he said. “They happen because somebody makes a mistake or bad decision.”

Such was the case last week, when a 28-year-old Scarborough motorcyclist was killed and his 20-year-old passenger critically injured in an accident on Rosedale Valley Rd.

“The deceased was an M1 rider. He was not permitted to carry any passengers and he was not permitted to ride at night,” said Stibbe. “This was entirely preventable and it’s something that we need everybody, including the passenger, to be beware of because anytime you get on a motorcycle or get in a vehicle with somebody who is inexperienced or is perhaps driving when they shouldn’t, you put yourself at risk. As a passenger, you need to take your safety into your own hands and you have that ability to keep your life safe while somebody else may put theirs at risk.”

Toronto Police and other law enforcement agencies across Canada are collaborating with the  Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to mark Canada Road Safety Week from May 12-18.

“This is a co-ordinated effort between police agencies aimed at achieving the goal of making Canada’s roads among the safest in the world,” said Stibbe. “Our focus in on the most dangerous actions on the roads and the target is on the Big Four Killers:  impaired operation by alcohol or drug, failure or improper use of seatbelts, distracted and aggressive driving.

For the first time, Toronto Police officers will participate in the National Enforcement Day for impaired driving on Saturday, May 16.

“This is a day that all police services in Canada will focus on getting anybody that is operating a motor vehicle while impaired off the streets,” Stibbe said.

TPS crest watermark