Seeking Justice for Murdered Teens

By Ron Fanfair, Toronto Police Service Published: 3 p.m. August 26, 2015

Detective Sergeant Terry Browne is confident that the killer(s) of two teenage boys two years ago will be apprehended and made to pay for their crimes.

A man talks to two women outside in a park
Detective Sergeant Terry Browne chats with Comfort Mireku and Reverend Sky Starr

O’She Doyles-Whyte and friend Kwame Duodu were fatally shot on August 23, 2013, near their homes in the Jane & Finch community.

The shooter(s) are still at large and Browne is appealing to the public for help.

“We still don’t have an explanation or answer,” said the lead investigator. “The families continue to grieve because the offenders are still out there. They are trying to find something positive from a very devastating event. This is a case that probably should have been solved the day of the crimes or shortly thereafter. We have a pretty good idea who may have been involved in this, but that does not give us enough to go forward with a charge.”

Browne is convinced justice will be served in the case.

“These were two young boys, who could have been my sons or anybody else’s sons, who weren’t involved in any mischief,” he said. “They were just enjoying one of the last Fridays before the re-opening of school. They spent the day socializing and just minding their own business when they were gunned down. This is not something that is going to be forgotten. Those who are responsible need to know that if they think their lives are going to move on, at some point I suspect, they will be identified. We have got pretty good direction about who is involved. We just need the really, really important parts to finalise it and close this case.”

Two women and a girl holding up a large cheque for five hundred dollars
Stephanie Whyte and Comfort Mireku present a scholarship cheque to Patreka Brown

Those who are responsible need to know that if they think their lives are going to move on, at some point I suspect, they will be identified. We have got pretty good direction about who is involved.

Browne joined the deceased family members and representatives from the community at the second annual OK basketball tournament and fun day on August 22, outside Oakdale Community Centre.

To commemorate the loss of their sons, Stephanie Whyte and Comfort Mireku launched a scholarship in their names. The winners were aspiring film director Malique Reid and Patreka Brown.

“This scholarship has special meaning because I knew O’She very well,” said Reid, who graduated from Downsview Collegiate Institute and enters York University next month to pursue film studies. “He was very outgoing and a go-getter with big dreams. I wasn’t that close with Kwame, but he was a good kid.”

York Memorial Collegiate Institute graduate Patreka Brown was also a recipient of a scholarship in the deceaseds’ names.

“I live in the community, so I would often see O’She and Kwame going to and from school and also during the summer,” she said. “It’s such a tragic and senseless loss and I am so grateful for this scholarship.”

Brown, who enters York University this semester, plans to teach French in high school.

Community worker and therapist Reverend Sky Starr said it’s important to commemorate the loss of these two young lives.

“It helps with the healing process for their mothers and the community,” she pointed out.

Prior to the scholarship awards, a minute of silence was observed in memory of Doyles-Whyte and Duodu.

“I am hoping that we, by our actions, attitudes and behaviours, will promote safety in our community,” added Starr.

Anyone with information can contact the Homicide Squad at (416) 808-7400, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416−222−TIPS (8477), online at  222tips.com, text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637), or Leave A Tip on Facebook.


Two women and a boy hold up a cheque for five hundred dollars, they are standing outside in a park
Stephanie Whyte and Comfort Mireku present a scholarship in their children's names to Malique Reid
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