Sloly Thanks Colleagues, Community

By Kevin Masterman, Toronto Police Service Published: 4:56 p.m. February 10, 2016
Updated: 9:38 p.m. February 10, 2016

It was a tough decision but the right time to leave the Service, says Deputy Chief Peter Sloly.

A man stands in front of microphones
Deputy Chief Peter Sloly speaks to the media after his resignation from the Service

The 27-year veteran, who was in charge of Operational Support Command, spoke to the media after the Toronto Police Services Board announced his resignation.

“It’s been a heck of a ride: 27 years in the best city, in the best country, in the best police service in the world. Can I tell you how thrilled I am to be part of this amazing organization and this amazing community. It has done so much for me,” he said. “It has made me into the man I am today. It has given me a strength that I would never thought I would have.”

He said his career in policing has opened up the world to him, travelling four continents, serving in a United Nations Peacekeeping Mission in Kosovo and also lending his expertise to the place of his birth, Jamaica.

“I can’t think of another career that would have given me as much reward as the Toronto Police Service has. I would recommend it to anybody that they would consider this Service and in the service of the community as a police officer anywhere in this country.”

I can tell you without any reservation I wouldn’t have traded a single day. This was the place I was meant to work. This is the place I was meant to lead in and this is the place I was proud to serve in. I leave with no regrets.

Sloly has been the executive champion for the Social Media Strategy, mobile app, the Summer Safety Plan, the Recruiting & Hiring strategy, the Police and Community Engagement Review and the Integrated Records & Information System project. He has led the creation of Diversity Management, Community Mobilization, Incident Command Cadre, the Emergency Preparedness Committee, the Business Excellence Award, Neighborhood Policing Program, FOCUS Rexdale Hub and the Victim/Witness Support Program.

“I also want to tell you that my success, and it has been considerable, I’m very proud of the work that I have done on behalf of the Service. I’m proud of the innovations I’ve made in the organization, the changes I’ve helped to make and in some cases to lead, but I’m most proud, most proud of the people that I’ve worked with and I want to be clear about who those people are. Those are all the men and women who every day come to work and do their very best as members of this Service. There are sworn, uniform officers on the frontline and there are civilian members that work in every part of this organization. There are people in every rank and every role because every one of them makes a difference in this city.”

He said is proud to have worked with non-profits and community members in order to make the city better as well as take time for young people who have come to him with questions or sought guidance.

“I can tell you without any reservation I wouldn’t have traded a single day. This was the place I was meant to work. This is the place I was meant to lead in and this is the place I was proud to serve in. I leave with no regrets.”

Sloly said he has no plans but spending time with his daughter, son and wife.

“It’s hard to leave. It’s heartbreaking to leave,” Sloly said. “It’s hard to leave not because of the bricks and mortar, it’s the people, the relationships.”

He said he was disappointed to never have become Chief but it does not overshadow his satisfaction with his career.

“I’m disappointed only briefly for my own personal aspiration but I’m so proud of what I’ve done, I’m so proud of this police service. Every single man and woman, every single officer on the frontline, every single civilian member that keeps those officers on the frontline. I’m proud of the partners who came forward to us. I’m proud of the victims who reported their issues to us. I’m proud of the people who’ve come to court to provide testimony – whether for or against the case – but to participate in the judicial system.”

He encouraged people to stay interested in policing issues and participate in the conversation around the future of policing.

TPS crest watermark