Hacking Fugitive Arrested

By Kevin Masterman, Toronto Police Service Published: 3:04 p.m. March 15, 2017

The Toronto Fugitive Squad arrested a Canadian man wanted by U.S. authorities as part of an international hacking investigation.

The word arrested
The Toronto Fugitive Squad made an arrest of Karim Baratov, who was wanted by U.S. authorities as part of a computer hacking investigation

Karim Baratov, 22, was arrested without incident at a home in Ancaster on Tuesday after 8 a.m.

A grand jury in the Northern District of California has indicted four defendants, including Baratov and two officers of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), for computer hacking, economic espionage and other criminal offenses in connection with a conspiracy, beginning in January 2014, to access Yahoo’s network and the contents of webmail accounts.

Baratov was born in Kazakhstan but is a Canadian citizen.

“Our people made the arrest,” Inspector Ken Taylor said. “These are the types of investigation we do on a daily basis. We find people to face extradition based on international charges.”

Taylor said the Fugitive Squad, the only one of its kind in Canada, works with U.S. and international agencies such as Interpol on a near-daily basis in pursuit of those who face charges outside of Canada.

“There is great expertise in tracking fugitives here,” said Fugitive Squad Detective Sergeant Wayne Banks. “But the worldwide reputation of the unit as to our integrity and credibility is why we have so many foreign jurisdictions reaching out to us to find offenders.”


Last year, the Squad made 135 arrests and 28 removals from Canada. This year, there have been 32 arrests in more than 140 active investigations.

The Squad arrests range from those being sought by the Canada Border Services Agency because of criminal admissibility to foreign jurisdictions seeking fugitives charged with murder, child exploitation or fraud charges.

“Our ultimate goal is to locate and arrest these international fugitives and return them to their jurisdictions to face prosecution,” Banks said.


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